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thermador
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A Fallout reading list

Getting ready for Fallout 4 but it just seems like it will never get here? 

How about some novels that inspired the series?

Feel free to share your suggestions (post-apocalyptic/post-nuclear) and I will add them to this post.

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T H E   L I S T


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On the Beach - Nevil Shute (1957)

The few remaining survivors in southern Australia await the radioactive cloud that is heading their way and bringing certain death to everyone in its path. Inspired the original Fallout, according to designer R. Scott Campbell.  This critically-acclaimed novel is a must-read.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/38180.On_the_Beach

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A Canticle for Leibowitz - Walter M. Miller Jr. (1959)

In a post-nuclear world, mankind struggles to rebuild and lives in a dark-ages world of city states, roving bands of raiders, mutants, fallout shelters, and poisonous radiation.  Won the 1961 Hugo Award for Best Novel, and inspired the original Fallout, according to designer R. Scott Campbell. 

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/164154.A_Canticle_for_Leibowitz

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Damnation Alley - Roger Zelazny (1968)

A raider is outfitted with a custom vehicle to drive cross country and deliver a plague vaccine after a nuclear holocaust.  The setting and premise of Lonesome Road was inspired by Damnation Alley, according to lead designer Chris Avellone. The film adaptation of Zelazny's novel was also one of several sources of inspiration for the original Fallout, according to designer R. Scott Campbell.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/239919.Damnation_Alley

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 A Boy And His Dog - Harlan Ellison (1969)

The short story that inspired the movie that probably inspired a lot of the Fallout series, a tale of a boy and his telepathic dog who work together as a team to survive in the post-apocalyptic world after a nuclear war.  Raiders, scavengers, vaults, oh my.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/16091263-a-boy-and-his-dog

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Emergence - David R. Palmer (1984)

A young girl is one of the last suvivors of a devistating bio-nuclear attack in this award-winning novel. 

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2300.Emergence

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 A Gift Upon the Shore - M.K. Wren (1990)

In the Pacific Northwest, nuclear war has triggered numerous natural disasters, and violent raiders terrorize the few survivors.  Two women struggle to preserve the last known library.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/149840.A_Gift_Upon_the_Shore

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The Road - Cormac McCarthy (2006)

A man and his son make a grim journey across the U.S. following an unknown apocalypse.  Winner of the Pulitzer Prize.  Hard to leave this off of any post-apocalyptic list.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6288.The_Road

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The Silo Series - Hugh Howey (2012-2014)

People live underground in a post-apoclyptic world, in a structure known as the Silo.  This series of books was recently re-published in a single volume, linked below.  A top 5 science fiction book on Amazon, with much critical acclaim.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/20745447-the-wool-trilogy

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The Dog Stars - Peter Heller (2012)

TrickyVein writes: A book I'd recommend is The Dog Stars. By Peter Heller, who's a new author as far as I know. Here's goodread's synopsis:

Hig somehow survived the flu pandemic that killed everyone he knows. Now his wife is gone, his friends are dead, and he lives in the hangar of a small abandoned airport with his dog, Jasper, and a mercurial, gun-toting misanthrope named Bangley.   But when a random transmission beams through the radio of his 1956 Cessna, the voice ignites a hope deep inside him that a better life exists outside their tightly controlled perimeter. Risking everything, he flies past his point of no return and follows its static-broken trail, only to find something that is both better and worse than anything he could ever hope for.

The ending was a little 'meh' and his characters didn't act the way you'd expect them to, finally; perhaps there were too many convenient things written into the story but it was still enjoyable.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13330761-the-dog-stars

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 Oryx and Crake - Margaret Atwood (2004)

TrickyVein writes: This is an incredible read. Margaret Atwood is an incredible writer. Oryx and Crake is profoundly disturbing and altogether convincing at the same time. Perhaps this is what makes it so impactful. At least, I thought.

Snowman, known as Jimmy before mankind was overwhelmed by a plague, is struggling to survive in a world where he may be the last human, and mourning the loss of his best friend, Crake, and the beautiful and elusive Oryx whom they both loved. In search of answers, Snowman embarks on a journey–with the help of the green-eyed Children of Crake–through the lush wilderness that was so recently a great city, until powerful corporations took mankind on an uncontrolled genetic engineering ride

Though it's the first in a trilogy, reading the other two isn't necessary. This is the best one.

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/46756.Oryx_and_Crake

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 Metro 2033 - Dmitry Glukhovsky (2005)

TrickyVein writes: Also, even though everyone recognizes the game, Metro 2033 is a superb post-apocalyptic novel.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17274667-metro-2033

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 Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang - Kate Wilhelm (1976)

The spellbinding story of an isolated post-holocaust community determined to preserve itself, through a perilous experiment in cloning. Sweeping, dramatic, rich with humanity, and rigorous in its science, Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang is widely regarded as a high point of both humanistic & hard SF, winning SF's Hugo Award and Locus Award on its first publication.

Thermador writes: You may read this and see similarities with the plots of Fallout 3 and 4, but this book was written in the 1970s.  A solid, thought-provoking post-apocalyptic read.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/968827.Where_Late_the_Sweet_Birds_Sang

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Z for Zachariah - Robert C. O'Brien (1976)

Ann Burden is sixteen years old and completely alone. The world as she once knew it is gone, ravaged by a nuclear war that has taken everyone from her. For the past year, she has lived in a remote valley with no evidence of any other survivors.

Thermador writes: a classic young adult novel that is a great intro to the genre.  If you didn't read it in school, you should pick it up.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/69477.Z_for_Zachariah

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The Dark Tower series - Stephen King (1982+)

Although not really post-nuclear, definitely post-apocalyptic.  Highly recommended!

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/43615.The_Gunslinger

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Alas, Babylon - Pat Frank (2005)

"Alas, Babylon." Those fateful words heralded the end. When a nuclear holocaust ravages the United States, a thousand years of civilization are stripped away overnight, and tens of millions of people are killed instantly. But for one small town in Florida, miraculously spared, the struggle is just beginning, as men and women of all backgrounds join together to confront the darkness.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/38169.Alas_Babylon

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Edited by: thermador on 01/04/2017 - 07:56
pintocat
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http://www.amazon.com/Wool

https://www.goodreads.com/series/70647-silo

Community living in a Silo that is slowly becoming more run-down. Kind of reminds me of City of Ember and a vault

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I'll add Damnation Alley to

I'll add Damnation Alley to the mix. A raider is outfitted with a custom vehicle to drive cross country and deliver a plague vaccine after a nuclear holocaust. 

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I'm reading A Canticle for

I'm reading A Canticle for Leibowtiz now. It was OK. I couldn't sympathize with the author's religious outlook.

The Wool trilogy was very good. There were some unanswered questions that might have become plot holes but altogether I think it had some interesting ideas and was very gripping throughout. 

A book I'd recommend is The Dog Stars. By Peter Heller, who's a new author as far as I know. Here's goodread's synopsis:

Hig somehow survived the flu pandemic that killed everyone he knows. Now his wife is gone, his friends are dead, and he lives in the hangar of a small abandoned airport with his dog, Jasper, and a mercurial, gun-toting misanthrope named Bangley.   But when a random transmission beams through the radio of his 1956 Cessna, the voice ignites a hope deep inside him that a better life exists outside their tightly controlled perimeter. Risking everything, he flies past his point of no return and follows its static-broken trail, only to find something that is both better and worse than anything he could ever hope for. 

The ending was a little 'meh' and his characters didn't act the way you'd expect them to, finally; perhaps there were too many convenient things written into the story but it was still enjoyable.


Also, even though everyone recognizes the game, Metro 2033 is a superb post-apocalyptic novel. 


This is an incredible read. Margaret Atwood is an incredible writer. Oryx and Crake is profoundly disturbing and altogether convincing at the same time. Perhaps this is what makes it so impactful. At least, I thought.

Snowman, known as Jimmy before mankind was overwhelmed by a plague, is struggling to survive in a world where he may be the last human, and mourning the loss of his best friend, Crake, and the beautiful and elusive Oryx whom they both loved. In search of answers, Snowman embarks on a journey–with the help of the green-eyed Children of Crake–through the lush wilderness that was so recently a great city, until powerful corporations took mankind on an uncontrolled genetic engineering ride

Though it's the first in a trilogy, reading the other two isn't necessary. This is the best one.

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The Gunslinger series by

The Gunslinger series by Stephen King.

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep by Philip K Dick, although not really post apocalyptic.

 

 

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The Martian https://en

The Martian https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Martian_(Weir_novel)

 

Its about a guy who gets left behind on mars and sciences the crap outta it to survive. Its very scientific, and funny

PEAW developer

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World War Z is actually a

World War Z is actually a pretty interesting read. 

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As someone who has been

As someone who has been reading it VERY slowly (all my books are electronic, when the e-reader dies, its the paperback I reach for) I can agree wholeheartedly. Don't judge the book based on the movie (which I actually didn't think was bad).

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Yeah. A buddy and I were just

Yeah. A buddy and I were just talking about the character of Redeker the other day.  It's clear why he didn't make it into the movie but... ehh.  Not something you see nearly enough of in popular fiction. That sort of pragmatism, even fictionally represented, gives me faith that humanity might just survive an apocalypse.

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Movies are 99% of the time

Movies are 99% of the time inferior to the novel if the novel came first, and usually even the novelization of a movie is better.

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That in respects is an

That in respects is an opinion in general.  Novels have more time to work with and often have to explain everything in detail for the reader to visualize the world and people surrounding often the main characters.  Movies do not, movies have to visually represent what a novel literally had to tell it's readers.  In most respects it falls down to an opinion vs anything else.   

Most people seem to dislike Movie Versions of Novels because more often than not the Movie didn't fall into "What" their mind personally viewed the world in that novel to be like, in turn, it isn't that the Novel is Better, it is just that sense of nostalgia in that individual's mind that makes them think it was better.  

Now give it, there are cases were for the sake of simplicity movies based of novels dumb themselves down, but more often than not that is also because there are aspects of a novel that in retrospect just to not translate well into a movie.  

I'm a huge movie Guru, most films based of novels I've seen I've been surprised how often people criticize and at times down right rage filled attack the film as though it was a pile of garbage.  In most cases that isn't the case, it is just they didn't like that it wasn't 100% like the novel, because of that one fact, they hate it.  

I often have to tell people you have to rate a movie, a film, TV show, video game, and even story on it's own and ignore that it's an adaptation, or that anything else within it's universe even exist.  If you can not do that, then you have no right to critics it.  

"You are only lost if you give up on yourself." Hans-Ulrich Rudel

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It depends on the style of

It depends on the style of writing. Action-focused and descriptive writing might as well be illustrating a movie that's taking place in the author's head, instead of using the medium as a tool to pry deeper into character's motives and thoughts - things that inherently aren't visual and are difficult to do well in film. This is why I think some stories function better as films than as books.

The Bourne movies were far superior to Ludlum's drivel, for instance.

Finch's adaptation of The Girl with a Dragon Tattoo was better than the book, too.*

I also think that The Martian will be a better film than a book because the main character had so little to say except crack wise about his situation.

*These are my opinions. 

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True, there are quite some

True, there are quite some visual extravaganza's that would not make good books. I concede your point.

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The Bourne books were the

The Bourne books were the first books I've ever read where I preferred the movie. And that, by a long shot.

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It's been a while since I

It's been a while since I read them but in my head didn't the first movie cover the three books worth of material that make the titles for all the Matt Damon Bourne movies?

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I don't believe so. I only

I don't believe so. I only really remember the second book and I know that it basic didn't happen in any of the movies. The whole thing is different between the books and movies. Could easily be wrong.

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I should look. I meant to box
I should look. I meant to box em up and send them to a buddy's unit overseas a couple years back but I never got around to it. I just seem to recall having the feeling that the first movie covered all three books. Dang. Now it's gonna bug me all day.
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Updated and added Where Late

Updated and added Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang

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I've read quite a few of

I've read quite a few of those, but where's "Alas, Babylon"?

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/38169.Alas_Babylon

 

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Added, thanks!

Added, thanks!